Hon. & Rev. Edward Rice, Dean Of Gloucester 

Hon. & Rev. Edward Rice, Dean Of Gloucester

Male 1779 - 1862

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  • Prefix  Hon. & Rev. 
    Suffix  Dean Of Gloucester 
    Birth  19 Nov 1779  Marylebone, London, ENGLAND Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender  Male 
    Died  15 Aug 1862 
    Person ID  I363  Fassifern Direct
    Last Modified  6 Sep 2010 

    Family  Charlotte Lascelles,   b. Abt May 1775,   d. 22 Feb 1832 
    Married  9 Jul 1800  St. Mary's Church, St. Marylebone, London Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
    >1. The Hon. Charlotte Rice,   b. 1 Jul 1805, Sutton, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 Sep 1882, Bayford Hall, Hertfordshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location
    Last Modified  6 Sep 2010 
    Family ID  F156  Group Sheet

  • Photos
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    rice_dean_e.jpg

  • Notes 
    • The Hon. & Very Rev. Dr. Edward Rice DD was born on 19 November 1776 at Marylebone, London; NOT in IGI. He was the son of The Rt. Hon. George Rice P.C., M.P. The Rt. Hon. Lady Cecil de Cardonnel Baroness Dinevor. The Hon. & Very Rev. Dr. Edward Rice DD was educated at Westminster School. He was up between 1794 and 1798 at Christ Church, Oxford, graduating in 1798. He "migrated to All Souls [shortly after graduating], and was at that college when he took his degree of Master of Arts in 1802," according to his obituary in The Times. He married Charlotte Lascelles, daughter of General Francis Lascelles and Ann or Anne Catley, on 9 July 1800 at St. Mary's Church, St. Marylebone, London; Charlotte was described as "2nd [sic] daughter of the late General L." Licence issued 8 July 1800, saying that ER was of the parish of St Mary le Bone, a bachelor aged 21 and upwards, and CL was of the same parish and age, a spinster. The Hon. & Very Rev. Dr. Edward Rice DD was "appointed by Archbishop Markham to the Precentorship of York Cathedral (sic) with the Prebendal stall of Driffield annexed, worth 400l. a-year" (held up to the time of his death): between 1802 and 1810 at York. He was vicar, succeeded by George Talbot MA (1810-11) (who was possibly a cousin, on his mother's side) and succeeding the successor of Lawrence Sterne (1738-1768) between 1803 and 1810 at All Hallows Church, Sutton-on-the-Forest. He was "in 1810, presented by his father" [this should be "brother": his father, George Rice, died in 1779] "Lord Dynevor to the Rectory of Great Rissington, near Morton-on-the-Marsh (sic), worth 650l. a-year. This benefice he held until 1856, when he resigned it in favour of his son, the Rev. Henry Rice." He was Rector of Oddington between 1820 and 1832. He was around 15th December 1825 (according to The Rev. Francis Witts' Diaries) "presented by the Earl of Liverpool, who was then Prime Minister, to the Deanery of Gloucester, worth 1,224l. a-year, with residence" (according to his Times obituary). He was installed on 20 January 1826, according to the Cathedral Librarian, being Dean for 37 years, until his death in 1862 (Gloucester's second longest-serving Dean). He was employed by Dean of Gloucester - this being the date of the formal Grant on 10 January 1826. He lived on 15 January 1829 at Gloucester, in the Deanery. He was dining on 11th November 1829 with Mr. Baillie at Great Rissington, and then spent the night at Barrington Park, where his brother Ld. Dynevor was staying with his family. He was at the Stow Clerical Society dinner, on 14th April 1830, at which stage he had "not yet embraced the new [Evangelical] doctrines to the full extent, though [was] apparently somewhat warped towards them", according to Witts. He was Curate to his son-in-law, William Sweet-Escott (so spelled in the Church list) between 1832 and 1834 at Oddington. He was at dinner with Francis Witts on 3 August 1836 at Upper Slaughter. He witnessed the baptism of (Edward) Hugo Rice-Wiggin on 17 May 1843 at the Cathedral, Gloucester; by his Grandfather, the Dean of Gloucester: godparents: The Rev. Francis Rice (uncle - later to become 5th Ld. Dinevor), B. Holme Wiggin (sic - not Mowbray!) (uncle) and Mrs. Beaumont (said by Frances Holme Scarlett to be "Aunt" Beaumont [if so, she would have been William Wiggin's sister Catherine]: FHS also said that all her furniture passed to Aunt Eva; and that she was married to Sir George Beaumont [but this is not borne out by Peter Fanshawe's research]; that both were very good-looking and lived in Richmond Park; but that he became a drunkard. The Hon. & Very Rev. Dr. Edward Rice DD witnessed the baptism of Augustus Holme Wiggin on 6 May 1846 at the Cathedral; by the Dean of Gloucester, his grandfather: the godparents were The Rev. Canon Bankes (said by Frances Holme Scarlett to come from Kingston Lacy - and probably the husband of the child's aunt Mary/Maria) and The Hon. Mrs Cochrane (the mother-in-law of the child's uncle B. Holme Wiggin/Mowbray). The Hon. & Very Rev. Dr. Edward Rice DD appeared in the 1851 census at The Deanery, Gloucester. He witnessed the baptism of Frederick John Rice Wiggin on 6 March 1852 at the Cathedral; godparents: The Dean of Gloucester (his grandfather), The Rev. [illegible] and Mrs. Ralston, the child's aunt (née Wiggin). The Hon. & Very Rev. Dr. Edward Rice DD was a founding trustee of the Warneford Diocesan and Ecclesiastical Charities in 1855. He appeared in the 1861 census at Oddington. He died on 15 August 1862 at Oddington, Glos., at age 85; "The vacant deanery, with which no other ecclesiastical preferment can be held, falls to the nomination of Viscount Palmerston. The late dean was heir presumptive to the barony of Dynevor, his nephew, the present baronet (sic) having no family. In consequence of his death the heir presumptive to the barony is his grandson [sic - an error, as that grandson's father was still alive, and indeed inherited], who is about 26 years of age." He was buried at Oddington; His tomb is outside the East end of the old church; and there is a window in his memory in the East walk of the Great Cloister at Gloucester Cathedral


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